Me and a Sea Star

Originally posted on Bethany Augliere Photography:

I saw a starfish on the ground
He was half buried in the sand
Just so out of place and ah
He was a long, long way from home

I was a long, long way from home
And so we talked a little while
Then I shook his hands, and I
I was a long, long way from home

~ Sister Hazel 

Today I felt like getting in the water but didn’t have a buddy- enter Blue Heron Bridge. I feel safe free diving at Blue Heron solo just because there are some many other people there, it’s right close to shore, and shallow. It is comfortable. However, I was pretty bored with the subject matter and not feeling particularly inspired by the hiding octopus or common batfish. Instead, I decided to try a less common subject- myself!

Here are two of my favorite shots from today. The first is…

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Why are maps of the universe elliptical?

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We often see elliptical sky maps because of something called Mollweide projection. This is used to convert our 3D spherical measurement of the sky into a flat, 2D representation. Unfortunately the conversion from 3D to 2D is not a perfect one and sacrifices in accuracy have to be made.

With a Mollweide projection, angle and shape are sacrificed in order to preserve proportions in area. This is why they’re used to create maps of the sky and the globe.

Area is often seen as the more- important property being observed. In a perfect world we wouldn’t have to make these compromises but as we currently operate in a 2D display- dominated world, displaying 3D data can prove to be tricky.